Religion in my Family and Disability

My family had a recent disturbing incident. At this point I don’t care if I offend anyone but I still won’t use real names. I have a family member with autism, we’ll call her Sophia the First. If you don’t know my family, most of us are very religious.  I love God and try my best to live my life in a positive way that I feel the bible has taught me. Not everyone that follows a religion, follows it the same way. With this said, here’s the situation…

Some people in my family that we’ll call Hydras, decided it was appropriate to pray over Sophia the First. Now prayers are always welcomed but not in the context that they did it. It was outrageous and hateful in my opinion. Hydra’s prayers were to cast out demons in Sophia the First. This was so disgusting. Demons?!? Really are we back in the old times were everyone who was different was evil? I really do not get how the Hydras thought they were doing the right thing. In what brain does that action register as okay.

When I was told about this incident, I didn’t say anything because I didn’t know what to say and I didn’t want to say the wrong thing. I told no one about it until 2 days later when I told my boyfriend and sister. I usually them everything right away but I guess I just didn’t want to think about this. I seriously couldn’t comprehend the actions of Hydra. At this point, I’m so sickened by this, I don’t want to see Hydra.

This situation brought up some past grudges my mom had with other Hydras in the family. She opened up to me and another family member of a similar situation that happened to her when Joel was born. Joel’s diagnosis came at his birth. No one was expecting it but that is no excuse for Hydra’s comments.

Hydra told my mom that she had to have been living in sin because children like that are not from God. God doesn’t give children like that. Hydra told my mom to pray for it to go away. My mom said she never told anyone about it and even though it bothered her and it was definitely not something a new mom to a child with a disability wants to hear, she pretended Hydra never said that. For the record, Joel is the greatest gift on this planet.

Religion is great, I love being a christian, but it was a weird effect on some people. I don’t understand why people would use God as an excuse to act so ridiculous and dangerous. We’ve seen it all through out history and it seems like those days are past us and then things like this happen.

Working in the field that I do, I have come across families that have had similar situations or that they themselves feel like God will take away a disability. I’ve even had people call that are in denial and think their child needs healing and some that use very harsh and ugly words to describe their child. But it felt so much more hurtful when it happened in my family. I do believe in healing but I believe you can’t heal someone from something that they are, something that’s a part of them.

I know everyone interprets the bible differently and everyone has the right to believe what they choose to, but don’t try to force it on someone else and don’t go around believing that you are right over everyone else. I just don’t believe people with disabilities have demons and I think it’s completely inappropriate to try to exorcise demons from them.

Its more important to love and accept each other’s differences and abilities. I know I can’t change the way some people think and arguing with them can most likely make it worse. So, I’ll hold on to peace.

Addition:

If you’re here you probably know what down syndrome is but I thought I would explain a little about autism. I got a request to clear some things up so here some information I often share with families with new diagnosis of autism. If you google autism, chances are you are going to find a lot of wrong and down right scary information. Take a look below.

What is autism?

When people refer to “Autism” today, they are usually talking about Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), which is a brain-based disorder characterized by social-communication challenges and restricted repetitive behaviors, activities, and interests. The Centers for Disease Control describes ASDs as: “a developmental disability that can cause significant social, communication and behavioral challenges. There is often nothing about how people with ASD look that sets them apart from other people, but people with ASD may communicate, interact, behave, and learn in ways that are different from most other people. The learning, thinking, and problem-solving abilities of people with ASD can range from gifted to severely challenged. Some people with ASD need a lot of help in their daily lives; others need less.”

What causes autism?

There is no known single cause for autism, although the best available science points to important genetic components. Through twin studies, scientists have determined that autism is a genetically based condition. If one identical twin has autism then there is an 36-95% chance that the other twin will also be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. For non-identical twins the chance is about 0-31% that both twins will develop autism spectrum disorder. The chance that siblings will both be affected by ASD is also about 2-18%.

Scientists are unsure what, if any, environmental triggers may be involved in autism. One theory, popular in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, that vaccines cause autism, has since been disproven by numerous studies conducted around the world.

Characteristics

Autism Spectrum Disorders are characterized by significant impairments in social interaction and communication skills, as well as by the presence of extremely challenging behaviors. Such behaviors include repetitive motor behaviors (hand flapping, body rocking), insistence on sameness, resistance to change and, in some cases, aggression or self-injury. Many individuals with an autism spectrum disorder have significant cognitive impairments, although some have typical or even above average IQs. 30-50% of people with autism also have seizures.

Prevalence:

In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) reported that approximately 1 in 68 children in the United States has been identified with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This rate remains the same as in 2014, which is the first time it has not risen. However, with respect to older data, this new estimate is roughly 30 percent higher than the previous estimate of 1 in 88 children reported in 2012. In the 1980s autism prevalence was reported as 1 in 10,000. In the nineties, prevalence was 1 in 2500 and later 1 in 1000.

It is problematic to compare autism rates over the last three decades, as the diagnostic criteria for autism have changed with each revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), which outlines which symptoms meet the criteria for an ASD diagnosis. In 1983 the DSM did not recognize PDD-NOS or Asperger’s syndrome, and the criteria for autistic disorder (AD) were more restrictive. The previous edition of the DSM, DSM-IV, included autistic disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, PDD-NOS, and Asperger’s Syndrome. Due to inconsistencies in diagnosis and how much we are still learning about autism, the most recent DSM only has one diagnosis, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which encompasses each of the previous four disorders. — this gives us reason to believe that autism is not really on the rise, it just means we’ve gotten better at identifying the disorder. It may have increased some but not as much as people are often led to believe.

ASDs continue to be almost 5 times more common among boys (1 in 42) than among girls (1 in 189) and they are reported in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.

 

All of this information was taken from: Autism Science Foundation 

I know this was a lot of science talk and what not. Let me know if you need more clarification or help understanding. Check out Down Syndrome and Other Developmental Disabilities Resources if you need more resources for a loved one with autism or other disabilities.

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